Divine Healing: Interwoven destiny

Who was the last person Jesus healed? Can Christians recall from Scripture when and where it took place? Tucked away in passages and verses about Jesus’ arrest the answer can be found.

Garden of Gethsemane scene in stained glass at Lavenham Parish Church in Suffolk, England. Photo courtesy of Robin Croft/Creative Commons

Garden of Gethsemane scene in stained glass at Lavenham Parish Church in Suffolk, England. Photo courtesy of Robin Croft/Creative Commons

Taking place on the Mount of Olives (Garden of Gethsemane) during the final moments preceding Jesus’ arrest, the last person healed was the servant of the high priest. The man, Malchus, had come with the toxic religious crowd who carried lanterns, torches and weapons.

The brief storyline unfolds in Matthew 26; Mark 14; Luke 22; and John 18. These four gospel writers mention the divine healing among other alarming and pressing facts evolving in the nighttime scene.

The Apostle John identifies Simon Peter and Malchus by their names while the other three writers keep that information less defined. For Matthew and Mark, the healing becomes secondary to the actual arrest. Only Luke, the physician, seemed intent on stating that the action involved Jesus touching the wound on the man’s head to reattach and heal the right ear that had been cut off. (Luke 22:47-53)

Three men, Peter, Jesus, Malchus, stood in close proximity of each other. Let’s look at how they teach readers of Scripture that a location packed with religious and emotional hostility should not overrule a physical crisis.

The Sword Of Fear

Depending on one’s point of view, some might define Simon Peter’s action as a defensive act initiated for Jesus’ protection rather than one motivated by his own personal fear. However while in panic mode and through his impetuous decision-making, Peter’s speed and swiftness in wielding the sword inflicted pain and potential death on Malchus. Jesus rebuked Peter for his reaction.

The Healing Hand

How compassionate and attuned to the need of another person Jesus was during the intensity of the hostile scene. While being arrested by the religious leaders of his day, the Lord’s mission of healing still took precedent. The horrific medical crisis did not go unmet.

The Lost Testimony

Never referenced again, the servant of the high priest and his miraculous healing fade away in the chaos as Jesus’ trial proceeds. Malchus, entrapped in the religious system, does not give testimony of any divine healing intervention. There is no known attempt on his part to alter the trial proceedings with the truth of Jesus’ divinity.

Like Malchus, testimonies about divine healing power fall by the wayside. Of all the multitudes of sermons preached on healing, rare do any center on this last person touched by the compassionate hand of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Lives are connected. One with another even in group situations. Each individual walks away from a challenging circumstance forever touched by the scene. The connection of Peter, Jesus, and Malchus teaches that interwoven destiny causes most events to have deeper meanings than immediately recognized in the moment.

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2 Responses to “Divine Healing: Interwoven destiny”

  1. Patrick

    “Who was the last person Jesus healed? Can Christians recall from Scripture when and where it took place?”

    What a bizarre question.
    If the last person Jesus healed didn’t get into scripture? Got missed out, by mistake? Or on purpose? Nobody looking?
    …How would we ever know? Or are we saying if it isn’t in scripture, it didn’t happen?

    Vast numbers of foolish people (it seems to me) base their entire lives on “Holy Scripture,” and none of them know any more than what they read.
    They don’t know for sure if it’s all true, part true, or all utter nonsense.
    …And neither do I.
    So, I’m personally inclined to withhold judgement on “Holy Scripture” – until further, more compelling, evidence becomes available.
    …Like never, probably. But who knows?

    Reply
  2. Denis Eble

    “The connection of Peter, Jesus, and Malchus teaches that interwoven destiny causes most events to have deeper meanings than immediately recognized in the moment.”

    Whether the sword and ear were actual events or metaphor will never be proven. Yet, compassion for others is clearly the message from the author of this story.

    Your conclusion re ‘deeper meanings’ applies to many human encounters. One also wonders about the term, synchronicity, and how this falls into the author’s message.

    Reply

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