VIEWPOINTS: Do you favor prayer at public meetings?

A recent survey showed that people favor prayer at public meetings — as long as it’s a generic prayer that’s not specifically Christian.

WIK_062613_prayinghands1-240x240According to the Fairleigh Dickinson University’s PublicMind survey, most registered voters (73 percent) said “prayer at public meetings is fine as long as the public officials are not favoring some beliefs over others.”

And 23 percent said “public meetings shouldn’t have any prayers at all because prayers by definition suggest one belief or another.”

The Religion News Service reported full findings, and we want you to chime on.

Do you favor prayer at public meetings?

 

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4 Responses to “VIEWPOINTS: Do you favor prayer at public meetings?”

  1. Michele Joseph

    Denis “I want my country back !” and his comment regarding this, now might be a good time to respond to this question of “Should there be prayer in public meetings”
    Absolutely, positively not ! Nor should there be in schools, or the Ten Commandments displayed in front of courthouses, or any of it.
    We know that there is a right wing, Dominionist agenda to make this ” a Christian nation”.
    The reason we have been able to live relatively peaceably in spite of having the most pluralistic, diverse nation in the world, is because of the separation of church and state.
    The Pilgrims left England for the right to worship as they wish.
    I am sure that there is no reader of this site who is naive enough to believe that the practice of public prayer would inevitably lead to prejudice and persecution.
    The N.D. professor who said “it is not wise or welcoming”. He knows.
    Justice Kagan, with her example of the Muslim woman ; she knows.
    We are all grown up enough to know that there are hateful people in the world, and how divisive and dangerous this practice would be.
    I, myself, have experienced incidents of persecution over religious beliefs.
    Religion is very personal. Didn’t Jesus say ” Do not pray on the street corners”?
    This site is different.
    We are all here voluntarily. We have chosen to take public stances, with the knowledge that doing that could bring judgement upon us.
    So, if there are consequences, we knew that going in, with our eyes wide open.
    But, nobody should be forced to take a public stance.
    Nor should anyone feel that they should pretend to be praying.
    As is always the case, I think a good guage for any question is the Golden Rule.
    To Christians who are for this religious supremist practice – how would
    you feel if, oh, say, Muslims were trying to establish such a practice with their prayers ?
    I don’t think it serves your crusading cause to continue upon this path.
    I have noticed growing hostilty towards Christians, and I can tell you that the reason for this is this growing Dominionism.
    I never in my life had a particle of hostility towards Christians, but I can tell you that with this recent activity- the attempt to dissolve the separation between church and state- I have some very negative feelings- not toward Jesus, mind you, or Christianity itself, but toward these right-wing Dominionists.
    To them I would say – ” Let’s make a deal- I won’t attempt to shove my religion down your throat- I ask that you give me the same respect.”

  2. Michele Joseph

    * “the practice of Public would NOT inevitably lead to persecution”

  3. Patrick

    “The Pilgrims left England for the right to worship as they wish. “

    This is true – although their basic reason for coming to America was to worship the way they wished, and prevent anyone else in their controlled territory from worshipping in any other fashion.
    Totally totalitarian, in fact.
    They said prayers in public all right – and God help anyone who wouldn’t say Pilgrim prayers, or wanted to say, for example, Catholic prayers, or Anglican prayers.
    No chance.
    And the idea of “the puritans” wanting to separate their church from their state is absurd.
    Their church was their state.

    …But we all know this. Just to make it clear.

  4. Michele Joseph

    Thanks for the clarification, Patrick.
    But, since the Constitution & wave after wave of immigration, it seems
    that the separation of church & state had become more important than ever, just to keep the peace.

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